Weekly Prompts

Weekly Prompts

Each Friday we are providing a Weekly Prompt to inspire your creative process. Our submissions are ongoing, so you can always respond to whichever prompt inspires you most. Submit your work by email (movement@barnard.edu) or by tagging @movementlabbarnard on Instagram. Your response can be whatever form you want -- videos, poetry, artwork, journal entries, etc. The goal of the prompts is to stimulate your creativity and we look forward to seeing the different ways that takes shape! 

View the Prompts and people's responses below: 

PROMPT: How do we define, protect, and honor self in digital spaces? How can we use digital tools to re-imagine and deconstruct spaces not built for us?

Image made in Unreal Engine 4 Editor of and by LaJuneimage from Unreal Editor created by and of LaJune
Images created by Featured Artist LaJuné for their Black Movement Project and to be used as inspiration for pushing the boundaries of visualizing self in digital spaces.

Hello?
Hello, are you there?
Can you see me?
Can you hear me?
Can you understand what I am saying?

Now that it is harder to understand each other do we pay closer attention? 

Can you see me? is an online installation that takes you through a choreography of the face through the simple act of mirroring (https://can-you-see-me.glitch.me/). Can you see me? was created by:​​​​ NiNi Dongnier, Tiri Kananuruk, Nuntinee Tansrasikul and Mimi Yin

Your own live video feed is superimposed on a pre-recorded video. Each day, the pre-recorded video will change as the choreography develops over the course of the week. See a demo of how it works below.


You can also experiment with mirroring with a friend instead of the pre-recorded video by using this Two-Way Mirror (https://two-way-mirror.glitch.me/).

Record a screen capture of your interaction and send it to us. Or respond to the prompt in some other way that makes sense to you. 
How to record your screen: Mac, iOS, Windows, Android

PROMPT: Making the Virtual Visceral: How do we make what we see, feel like what we experience?

As we practice ‘social distancing’ performances and meetings have gone online. Many of these experiences are wonderful, but we also often feel that something is missing, or lost in the virtual realm. For the Dolphin Dance Project, this is a constant challenge. We can never bring human audiences to witness our dances, which happen 30 feet or more underwater in distant, pristine oceans. Yet, what we want to share most is the live performance: the visceral experience of intimate, in-the-moment, improvised exchanges, the vibrant presences of human and dolphin dancers. Connecting you virtually to our physical experience is always on our agenda. We invite you to watch this Highlights clip as well as the other films that will be presented during Chisa's week-long Artist Feature, and respond/create around the proposition of making virtual connections and sharing visceral experiences, across physical distances and across species.

PROMPT: Video by Guy de Lancey with Nitrile gloves and PoseNet. Touch and Hands have taken on a new and heightened significance. So has the word 'distance'. Technology has made a claim to truncating and annihilating distance. Biology (the virus) has exacerbated it. The tension between these claims is either stasis... or movement.

"We take care not to touch each other in public, nor do we look into each others eyes except furtively, because Ivan must first wash my eyes with his own, removing the images which landed on my retina before his arrival" - Ingeborg Bachmann.

Distance from Barnard Movement Lab on Vimeo.